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Civil - Highway Engineering - Geometric Design Of Highways

Highways Design: Mechanical and Psychological widening

   Posted On :  23.07.2016 09:59 pm

The reasons for the mechanical widening are: When a vehicle negotiates a horizontal curve, the rear wheels follow a path of shorter radius than the front wheels

Mechanical widening

 

The reasons for the mechanical widening are: When a vehicle negotiates a horizontal curve, the rear wheels follow a path of shorter radius than the front wheels. This phenomenon is called o - tracking, and has the effect of increasing the effective width of a road space required by the vehicle. Therefore, to provide the same clearance between vehicles traveling in opposite direction on curved roads as is provided on straight sections, there must be extra width of carriageway available. This is an important factor when high proportion of vehicles are using the road. Trailor trucks also need extra carriageway, depending on the type of joint. In addition speeds higher than the design speed causes transverse skidding which requires additional width for safety purpose. The expression for extra width can be derived from the simple geometry of a vehicle at a horizontal curve as shown in figure. Let R1 is the radius of the outer track line of the rear wheel, R2 is the radius of the outer track line of the front wheel l is the distance between the front and rear wheel, n is the number of lanes, then the mechanical widening Wm is derived below:

 

Psychological widening

 

`Widening of pavements has to be done for some psychological reasons also. There is a tendency for the drivers to drive close to the edges of the pavement on curves. Some extra space is to be provided for more clearance for the crossing and overtaking operations on curves. IRC proposed an empirical relation for the psychological

 

Widening at horizontal curves Wps:

 

Length of transition curve

 

The length of the transition curve should be determined as the maximum of the following three criteria: rate of change of centrifugal acceleration, rate of change of superelevation, and an empirical formula given by IRC.

 

Rate of change of centrifugal acceleration

 

At the tangent point, radius is infinity and hence centrifugal acceleration is zero. At the end of the transition, the radius R has minimum value R. The rate of change of centrifugal acceleration should be adopted such that the design should not cause discomfort to the drivers. If c is the rate of change of centrifugal acceleration, it is given by an empirical formula suggested by by IRC

 

Vertical alignment

 

The vertical alignment of a road consists of gradients(straight lines in a vertical plane) and vertical curves. The vertical alignment is usually drawn as a pro le, which is a graph with elevation as vertical axis and the horizontal distance along the centre line of the road as the the horizontal axis. Just as a circular curve is used to connect horizontal straight stretches of road, vertical curves connect two gradients. When these two curves meet, they form either convex or concave. The former is called a summit curve, while the latter is called a valley curve.


Tags : Civil - Highway Engineering - Geometric Design Of Highways
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